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Brutalizing space in the pursuit of cool
Thoughts on scale and the modern world, amid a search for humanity


zenkitty714:

earthmoonlotus:

fuckyeahrachelsawyer:

madame-ganj:

nezua:

hardcoregurlz:

Slave gravesite in New York City

“SOMETHING YOUR TOUR GUIDE MIGHT NOT TELL YOU: 
The heart of NYC’s Financial District is built on a huge 18th century African Burial Ground. Some 419 Africans were discovered in 1991, a large portion women and children.
The burial ground extends from Broadway Southward under City Hall, and almost to the site of the former World Trade Center. It is believed that there are as many as 20,000 slavery-era Africans in graves under the buildings in Lower Manhattan. 
Abolish historical amnesia and ponder for a moment the fact that this financial epicenter of the world is built on slavery, oppression, and death.”
Literally, and daily.

damn

One of my anthropology professors actually worked at this dig site and told us all about it. Super interesting, and very important. I highly suggest everyone do their research. (Just look here, here, here and here *this one is an article by my professor*)

I’ve reblogged this before, but this version has sources, so…

Did not know this.

zenkitty714:

earthmoonlotus:

fuckyeahrachelsawyer:

madame-ganj:

nezua:

hardcoregurlz:

Slave gravesite in New York City

“SOMETHING YOUR TOUR GUIDE MIGHT NOT TELL YOU: 

The heart of NYC’s Financial District is built on a huge 18th century African Burial Ground. Some 419 Africans were discovered in 1991, a large portion women and children.

The burial ground extends from Broadway Southward under City Hall, and almost to the site of the former World Trade Center. It is believed that there are as many as 20,000 slavery-era Africans in graves under the buildings in Lower Manhattan. 

Abolish historical amnesia and ponder for a moment the fact that this financial epicenter of the world is built on slavery, oppression, and death.”

Literally, and daily.

damn

One of my anthropology professors actually worked at this dig site and told us all about it. Super interesting, and very important. I highly suggest everyone do their research. (Just look here, here, here and here *this one is an article by my professor*)

I’ve reblogged this before, but this version has sources, so…

Did not know this.

— 1 day ago with 101739 notes

zenkitty714:

200degreemrfahrenheit:

Series of paintings discovered in an abandon mental asylum in Italy.

Terrifying and wonderful.

— 2 days ago with 166068 notes

ozziescribbler:

princesse—odette:

rickonroll:

petite-madame:

pawnr:

untilyoufoundme:

Breaking news from Paris! The Pont des Arts, famous because of the large amount of love locks which were placed on its fences by thousands of couples… began to collapse due to the high weigh of these love locks.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, as a consequence, ordered the removal of all the love locks. The Pont des Arts will never be the same anymore.

An international love symbol has disaspeared…

NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :(((( this is so sad!

y’all are overreacting, two and a half meters of the railing collapsed, out of the entire bridge it looks like nothing, it’ll be repaired and back up in no time.

I’m not used to vent but as it concerns my home town…(Sorry in advance about my English)

I’m sorry, we are not “overreacting”: we are concerned about an historical monument that is important to us, Parisians, and we are worried for obvious safety reasons. Somebody could have fallen. This isn’t the first time that a part of the bridge has collapsed due to these damn locks, it also happened last summer apparently causing the bridge to be closed.

In addition, if you combine all the weight of the locks together, it’s more than 12 tons of steel and it causes serious damage to the structure of the bridge itself.

This trend has to die like yesterday.

It’s not something that belongs to an “old and beautiful tradition” linked to Paris, the city of Love. It started in 2008-09 in Paris and it blew out of proportion because the vendors right next to the bridge saw a commercial opportunity when it came to selling locks to tourists. It looked like a good idea at the start: the tourists were happy, the vendors next to the bridge were happy and even the Maire because it showed Paris as a romantic city. Now, the Passerelle des Arts is in a piss poor state and so is the Pont Notre-Dame, a little bit less famous.

Not to mention that the tourists throw away the keys in the Seine and that it’s an ecological aberration.

More down to earth consideration: it cost money to repair the bridge and remove the locks every two-three weeks little by little. I’d prefer this money to be used for something else. It’s also difficult to cut the locks and reuse the iron because apparently, they are all made out of different types of metal. In the meantime, and according to Bruno Julliard who is in charge of Culture & Historical monuments at the Paris city hall, the removed locks are kept in a secret location, like the Ark of the Covenant in the Indiana Jones movies.

So guys, next time you come to Paris, PLEASE forget about these damn locks. You have 100 ways of proving your love to your S.O when in Paris.

REBLOGGING! Because this definitely needs to stop.

It’s also not just a Parisian thing. People leave love locks on bridges in Ljubljana and Minsk as well. The clearing away of the locks in Paris isn’t going to destroy an ‘international love symbol’. It would, however, be extremely sad if people decided that keeping the mass of locks on the Parisian bridge was worth more than the safety of other human beings.

I’ve lived in Paris, vacationed in Paris, and been to Paris on business.

The Pont des Arts was beautiful for a very long time before these stupid locks were attached to it a few years ago. And I hate to sound like an old man, but it’s so much more beautiful without them.

(Source: a-little-yellow-duck-feather, via miwrighting)

— 3 days ago with 126137 notes
perpill:

Gázfogadó állomásBudapest III. / Váradi utca 22.

perpill:

Gázfogadó állomás
Budapest III. / Váradi utca 22.

(via amunt)

— 4 days ago with 353 notes

designismymuse:

Heydar Aliyev Center by Zaha Hadid Architects in Baku, Azerbaijan (via zaha-hadid.com)

Retro sixties brutalism.

And much like the earlier works it referenced, a sense of scale is expressed only in the staggered curtainwall.

(via amunt)

— 5 days ago with 401 notes
So, this can happen when you slope glazing outward. Harsh.

So, this can happen when you slope glazing outward. Harsh.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#reminder  #san Diego 
"Art People" →

hotel-job:

(A married couple in their late-40’s approaches the desk.)

MAN: What’s that building we see when we look out our window?
CONCIERGE: What does it look like?
WOMAN: It’s not the Empire State Building. It’s the one when we face the window next to the bathroom.
CONCIERGE: Closer to…

— 1 week ago with 891 notes
infrastructures:

corporationsarepeople:

threenotch:

inmyivystance:

tarynel:

killathegawd:

joyfullycatholic:

Detroit, 2008-2013.

But this is sad…

What happened mane

Global recession prompted an economic crisis.

No, what caused thus was a wholesale move of ALL of Americas manufacturing base to China. Detroit was a hub of manufacturing of many items that are now made by virtual slave labor in China and sold here at the same price that the items once made in Detroit sold for, so you see the huge profit potential right.

Partly, but Detroit is a unique case.
Detroit is surrounded by the some of the richest zip codes in the entire country. That city is an example of what can happen when our wealthiest turn their backs on their neighbors and ask the poorest communities to shoulder the financial burden of intensive urban infrastructure, cultural community, and re-building, and then lock themselves away in their enclaves of obliviousness. It is an example of self-segregation’s impact.
Detroiters seceded physically and economically from Detroit, and left its core to die. While other cities around the country have rebuilt and grown, Detroit had no funds with which to do that. It was simply starved out.
Regionally, locally, nationally, we are all in the same boat. We can create other Detroits around the country if we choose to do so. Or we can focus on raising the tide.
The condition of Detroit is a cautionary tale of apathy built on selfishness. We can all learn from it.

Excellent commentary.

infrastructures:

corporationsarepeople:

threenotch:

inmyivystance:

tarynel:

killathegawd:

joyfullycatholic:

Detroit, 2008-2013.

But this is sad…

What happened mane

Global recession prompted an economic crisis.

No, what caused thus was a wholesale move of ALL of Americas manufacturing base to China. Detroit was a hub of manufacturing of many items that are now made by virtual slave labor in China and sold here at the same price that the items once made in Detroit sold for, so you see the huge profit potential right.

Partly, but Detroit is a unique case.

Detroit is surrounded by the some of the richest zip codes in the entire country. That city is an example of what can happen when our wealthiest turn their backs on their neighbors and ask the poorest communities to shoulder the financial burden of intensive urban infrastructure, cultural community, and re-building, and then lock themselves away in their enclaves of obliviousness. It is an example of self-segregation’s impact.

Detroiters seceded physically and economically from Detroit, and left its core to die. While other cities around the country have rebuilt and grown, Detroit had no funds with which to do that. It was simply starved out.

Regionally, locally, nationally, we are all in the same boat. We can create other Detroits around the country if we choose to do so. Or we can focus on raising the tide.

The condition of Detroit is a cautionary tale of apathy built on selfishness. We can all learn from it.

Excellent commentary.

— 1 week ago with 18263 notes
goodstuffhappenedtoday:

This Bus Is Transforming The Lives Of The Homeless

BY SCOTT KEYES

Most of us have suffered through the frustration of needing to quickly get ready for work, only to have to wait for a roommate to finish his shower. Now imagine having to share that shower with not one or two other people, but hundreds.
That’s precisely the situation facing San Francisco’s estimated6,436homeless residents, who currently have just seven places in the city where they can shower.
Motivated by the belief that everyone has the right to be clean, Doniece Sandoval foundedLavaMae, a non-profit with an innovative idea: take old, unused city buses and retrofit them with fully functioning showers for homeless people to use. Last weekend, LavaMae, a play on the Spanish word for “wash me,” launched its first mobile bus.
“Our buses were designed in consultation with homeless people,” Sandoval told ThinkProgress, a process that has taken over a year.
The interior of one of LavaMae’s mobile shower buses
CREDIT: KENA FRANK

For example, many homeless women expressed concern for their safety and privacy while showering. As a result, Sandoval and her team designed two individual shower pods in each bus, one of which is accessible for persons with disabilities.
Each pod includes not only a shower, but also a toilet, sink, and a space to temporarily store one’s things. Each bus will permit around 30 people to shower on a given day. Once all four buses are running, Sandoval estimates they will be able to provide more than 2,000 showers per week. (See more photos of the buses and interiorhere.)
“We’re mobile because we want to reach people where they are,” Sandoval said. In addition, “If we built a brick-and-mortar concept, it would cost a whole lot more.”
The city donated four decommissioned municipal buses to LavaMae and allows the organization to tap into fire hydrants, but retrofitting them with shower pods costs $75,000 per bus.
Funding for the buses comes from a mix of sources. LavaMae raised $58,000 from an Indiegogo campaign, as well as contributions from individuals and small private family foundations. Sandoval and her husband also put a significant amount of their own money into the project.

More at the link.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

This Bus Is Transforming The Lives Of The Homeless

BY SCOTT KEYES

Most of us have suffered through the frustration of needing to quickly get ready for work, only to have to wait for a roommate to finish his shower. Now imagine having to share that shower with not one or two other people, but hundreds.

That’s precisely the situation facing San Francisco’s estimated6,436homeless residents, who currently have just seven places in the city where they can shower.

Motivated by the belief that everyone has the right to be clean, Doniece Sandoval foundedLavaMae, a non-profit with an innovative idea: take old, unused city buses and retrofit them with fully functioning showers for homeless people to use. Last weekend, LavaMae, a play on the Spanish word for “wash me,” launched its first mobile bus.

“Our buses were designed in consultation with homeless people,” Sandoval told ThinkProgress, a process that has taken over a year.

The interior of one of LavaMae's mobile shower buses

The interior of one of LavaMae’s mobile shower buses

CREDIT: KENA FRANK

For example, many homeless women expressed concern for their safety and privacy while showering. As a result, Sandoval and her team designed two individual shower pods in each bus, one of which is accessible for persons with disabilities.

Each pod includes not only a shower, but also a toilet, sink, and a space to temporarily store one’s things. Each bus will permit around 30 people to shower on a given day. Once all four buses are running, Sandoval estimates they will be able to provide more than 2,000 showers per week. (See more photos of the buses and interiorhere.)

“We’re mobile because we want to reach people where they are,” Sandoval said. In addition, “If we built a brick-and-mortar concept, it would cost a whole lot more.”

The city donated four decommissioned municipal buses to LavaMae and allows the organization to tap into fire hydrants, but retrofitting them with shower pods costs $75,000 per bus.

Funding for the buses comes from a mix of sources. LavaMae raised $58,000 from an Indiegogo campaign, as well as contributions from individuals and small private family foundations. Sandoval and her husband also put a significant amount of their own money into the project.

More at the link.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

— 1 week ago with 6177 notes
"Sprawl" -- it's a noun! It's a verb! It's a problem. →

atlurbanist:

A recent post in the Atlanta Business report claims that Atlanta is “no longer the King of Sprawl" — basing this claim on a report from Georgetown University. Awesome! So, we’re done with it, right? We can all take a metro-wide walk outside to a pocket park and forget the…

— 2 weeks ago with 16 notes
theatlanticcities:

The greater New York metro, far and away America’s largest and richest, is projected to produce $1.4 trillion dollars in GMP in 2014. This makes it about the same size as Australia, equivalent the world’s 12th largest economy.
L.A., projected to account for almost $830 billion in GMP, has a larger economy than that of the Netherlands, and would therefore number among the world’s top 20 economies.
Chicago, with more than $610 billion in GMP, is about the same size as Switzerland and significantly bigger than Sweden.
Houston, approaching $490 billion in economic output, is comparable to Poland or Taiwan.
Greater Washington, D.C., with nearly $480 billion in GMP, and Dallas, with $460 billion, are larger than Austria and about on par with Argentina.
Philadelphia and San Francisco, with about $400 billion in GMP each, are comparable to Thailand. 
Greater Boston, with $360 billion, is larger in economic size than Denmark, and produces slightly less than Colombia.
Atlanta, with $320 billion in economic output, and Miami, with almost $300 billion, are comparable to Singapore and Malaysia.
Seattle, with $280 billion in GMP, is comparable to Hong Kong or Chile.
Detroit, with $220 billion in output, is projected to produce more than Ireland.
Each of these metros would rank among the 50 largest economies in the world.

theatlanticcities:

  • The greater New York metro, far and away America’s largest and richest, is projected to produce $1.4 trillion dollars in GMP in 2014. This makes it about the same size as Australia, equivalent the world’s 12th largest economy.
  • L.A., projected to account for almost $830 billion in GMP, has a larger economy than that of the Netherlands, and would therefore number among the world’s top 20 economies.
  • Chicago, with more than $610 billion in GMP, is about the same size as Switzerland and significantly bigger than Sweden.
  • Houston, approaching $490 billion in economic output, is comparable to Poland or Taiwan.
  • Greater Washington, D.C., with nearly $480 billion in GMP, and Dallas, with $460 billion, are larger than Austria and about on par with Argentina.
  • Philadelphia and San Francisco, with about $400 billion in GMP each, are comparable to Thailand. 
  • Greater Boston, with $360 billion, is larger in economic size than Denmark, and produces slightly less than Colombia.
  • Atlanta, with $320 billion in economic output, and Miami, with almost $300 billion, are comparable to Singapore and Malaysia.
  • Seattle, with $280 billion in GMP, is comparable to Hong Kong or Chile.
  • Detroit, with $220 billion in output, is projected to produce more than Ireland.

Each of these metros would rank among the 50 largest economies in the world.

(Source: thisiscitylab, via jron)

— 2 weeks ago with 138 notes